gareth-southgate-england

Were Southgate’s England all they were cracked up to be?

England were eliminated by Croatia in the semi-finals of the World Cup. The Three Lions’ dream was over, but their journey to the final four captured the imagination of a nation. On reflection, however, did England perform as expected given their opposition? Was their run to the semi-final as impressive as first made out?

Manager Gareth Southgate took the plaudits for the part he played in getting England further than they’ve been since 1990, but should a side gain so much credit for winning just three of their seven games in the World Cup? The Three Lions only beat Sweden, Tunisia and Panama and failed to see past Colombia, Belgium (twice) and Croatia in normal time. It’s nothing special, is it?

Game-by-game analysis

England struck late in their opening group game with Tunisia, with Harry Kane sealing a 2-1 win at the death. While in control for the majority of the match, England couldn’t hold onto their early lead and were taken the distance by a side deemed considerably inferior.

They were more convincing against Panama, but the North America side were big underdogs to register a point on the board. Beating them wouldn’t earn England too many plaudits, even if Kane came away with a hat-trick. Southgate’s men were expected to win. Their first big test would always be against Belgium in the final group game.

Roberto Martinez’s men were fancied to go far at the World Cup and got the better of England when the two sides met – 1-0. Southgate had made changes to the first-team, but his side underperformed against Belgium. Qualification was already confirmed but going through in second place would have mean avoiding the pre-tournament favourites.

A Colombia side missing James Rodriguez awaited England in the last-16 and they still took the Three Lions to penalties. The South American side started strong, faded at the mid-point and ended strongly, scoring in the last minute after giving away a penalty in the 53rd minute. It took a penalty shootout to separate the sides, but things were easier in the quarter-final.

Sweden were no match for England and Southgate’s men won 2-0 without much trouble. Goals either side of half-time saw England into the semi-finals of the World Cup for the first time in 28 years, but Croatia proved to be no slouches.

Player-for-player, many will argue England are the better side, but Croatia were certain better coached. Despite falling behind minutes into the game, Zlatko Dalić’s men were calm and believed in their ability to get back into the match with a patient style of build-up play. They scored to take the game to extra time and found the net midway through the second-half of extra time to book their place in the final.

England’s tournament ended on a further sour note after losing to Belgium again without scoring in the third-place playoff – reminding supporters that the Three Lions may have finished fourth, but they aren’t the fourth-best nation.

There’s a trend with the games England won in normal time and the matches they didn’t. Getting to the semis is an achievement in itself, but was their journey so impressive given the results? Would England sides of the past also fall short?

gareth-southgate-england

Can England beat Colombia in the last-16 of the World Cup?

England were drawn against Colombia in the last-16 of the World Cup on Thursday, June 28 after finishing second in Group G following their 1-0 defeat to Belgium in their last game.

The Three Lions qualified with six points from a possible nine – after wins in their two opening games against Tunisia and Panama – and many now believe they have a great opportunity to reach the semi-finals due to the luck of their draw (Colombia in the last-16, Sweden/Switzerland in the quarter-finals, Spain/Russia/Croatia/Denmark in the semi-finals).

But are England underestimating Colombia? The South American side reached the quarter-finals of the 2014 World Cup – England were eliminated at the group stage. The Three Lions don’t have the best record in tournaments after the group stage, so why are many assuming a victory for Gareth Southgate’s men?

How good are Colombia?

Colombia booked their place in the last-16 of the World Cup after finishing top of Group H with six points from a possible nine. They lost their opener to Japan but recovered with consecutive victories against Poland and Senegal. José Pékerman’s side have made history, as it’s only the third time ever that Colombia have reached the knockouts of a World Cup (1990, 2014, 2018).

They’re a much stronger outfit these days, boasting talent such as David Ospina (Arsenal), Cristián Zapata (AC Milan), Yerry Mina (Barcelona), Davinson Sanchez (Tottenham Hotspur) Radamel Falcao (AS Monaco), James Rodriguez (Real Madrid), Juan Cuadrado (Juventus) and Carlos Bacca (Villarreal).

They’re no slouches and their form ahead of the tournament wasn’t bad either. Colombia had picked up two wins and two draws from their last four internationals prior to the World Cup, beating France and China, while drawing with Australia and Egypt – keeping three clean sheets for their troubles. England shouldn’t underestimate Pékerman’s side, especially given their own poor record in knockout games

How have England fared in knockout games in past tournaments?

England have won the World Cup (1966) and reached a semi-final (1990) but haven’t gone further than the quarter-finals since. The Three Lions have won 10 of their last 24 World Cup games after their antics in 1990, while failing to win a knockout fixture since 2006. They don’t have the best record against big nations in the tournament either.

Since reaching the quarter-finals of the 2006 World Cup, England have beaten Slovenia (2010), Tunisia (2018) and Panama (2018). It’s a poor record in the tournament and one that will give Colombia a lot of confidence ahead of Tuesday’s fixture. Time will tell if England can finally buck the trend.

mauricio pochettino tottenham

Pochettino and Kane agreeing new deals are Tottenham’s best summer signings

Tottenham Hotspur did well to tie down manager Mauricio Pochettino to a long-term deal a week before the Real Madrid vacancy arose, as well as getting Harry Kane to agree a long-term contract just four days before the England World Cup squad travelled to Russia.

Spurs secured the futures of two highly-important figures at the club whose commitment to the London outfit could soon be followed by the rest of the squad. Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli are two players in talks over new deals and more could follow this summer.

Tottenham cashing in on two players who missed a lot of last season

Belgian centre-back Toby Alderweireld and midfielder Mousa Dembele are two players being linked with a move away from Tottenham and have just 12 months left on their respective deals. However, Alderweireld and Dembele haven’t had constructive contract talks with Spurs and could be put up for sale if an agreement over an extension isn’t reached this summer.

Alderweireld made only 14 Premier League appearances in an injury-hit 2017/18 campaign and saw Davinson Sanchez nail down a starting place at the back in his absence. Tottenham are unwilling to meet his wage demands and are open to a sale for £75m. Chairman Daniel Levy will drive a hard bargain to get maximum value from the centre-back and may do the same for Dembele.

The 30-year-old has also seen his contract demands rebuffed by Tottenham this summer. Dembele wants a long-term deal, but Spurs aren’t budging. The Belgian was substituted on or substituted off in 20 of his 28 Premier League appearances last season, highlighting his dwindling fitness levels and influence on the pitch.

Tottenham have Moussa Sissoko and Victor Wanyama in his absence and have been linked with Olympique Lyonnais’ 21-year-old midfielder Tanguy NDombele. Dembele would surely fetch a decent price too, as he’s been a good servant in his six years with the Londoners.

Big names could join Tottenham as key players are set to stay

After Tottenham’s stadium move, there were fears the club could suffer financially and have to put their best players up for sale. But it actually appears Spurs are in a healthy place and have scrapped their wage structure to tie down their most important talent. Should the likes of Eriksen and Alli follow Pochettino and Kane, big-name players in Europe could be convinced to make the switch.

Since Pochettino was appointed manager of Tottenham, the club have finished fifth (2014/15), third (2015/16), second (2016/17) and third (2017/18) in the Premier League. There was a fear that fantastic record could be ruined by a troublesome 2018/19 campaign had they resorted to cost-cutting measures, but now they could further improve the squad.

Tottenham should be firmly in the race for a top-four finish next season, so players shouldn’t consider it a gamble to move White Hart Lane. Spurs have racked up 70 points or more in each of the last three campaigns and are tying down their most important personnel to ensure a good season is too come.

 

Emre Can

Toure to exit Man City, Can leaving Liverpool: Premier League clubs submit released list

Yaya Toure (Manchester City) and Emre Can (Liverpool) are two notable departures as the 20 Premier League clubs submit their released list.

Michael Carrick (Manchester United) is retiring to become a first-team coach and Per Mertesacker (Arsenal) is retiring to become Head of Academy

AFC Bournemouth

  • Allsop, Ryan
  • Cargill, Baily James
  • Harfield, Oliver John
  • Matthews, Samuel Lloyd
  • O’Flaherty, Patrick
  • Quigley, Joseph Richard
  • Wiggins, Rhoys Barry

Arsenal

  • Bola, Marc Joel
  • Cazorla, Santiago
  • Crean, Alexander Felix
  • Eyoma, Aaron Jordan
  • Huddart, Ryan David
  • Johnson, Chiori
  • Keto, Hugo Oliver
  • Mertesacker, Per
  • Moore, Tafari Lalibela

Brighton & Hove Albion

  • Ajiboye, David Ibukun
  • Ayunga, Jonah Ananias Paul
  • Dallison-Lisbon, Thomas Albert
  • Hornby-Forbes, Tyler Cecil
  • Hunemeier, Uwe
  • Hutchinson, Desmond John
  • Ince, Rohan
  • Kone, Mamadou Saliou
  • Krul, Timothy Michael
  • Myles Meekums, Reece Christopher
  • O’Sullivan, Rian Michael
  • Rosenior, Liam James
  • Sidwell, Steven James

Burnley

  • Anderson, Thomas Robert
  • Arfield, Scott
  • Barnett, Jordan Thomas
  • Birch, Arlen Tom
  • Ginnelly, Joshua Lloyd
  • Jackson, Bradley Allen
  • Layton, Samuel Jay Dixon
  • Limb, Harry
  • Long, Christopher
  • Marney, Dean Edward
  • Metz, Khius
  • Nabi, Rahis
  • Thomas, Jamie Carl

Chelsea

  • Beeney, Mitchell Ryan
  • Christie-Davies, Isaac David
  • Dasilva, Cole Perry
  • Delac, Matej
  • Dos Reis Carvalho, Eduardo
  • Houghton, Jordan
  • Masampu, Renedi
  • Oliveira Dos Santos, Wallace
  • Walters, Tushaun-Tyreese

Crystal Palace

  • Berkeley-Agyepong, Jacob Kwame
  • Cabaye, Yohan
  • Cavalieri, Diego
  • Coker, Andre Jordan Coleridge
  • Delaney, Damien Finbarr
  • Fundi, Victor
  • Lee, Chung Yong
  • Sako, Bakary
  • Ward, Joel Edward Philip

Everton

  • Baxter, Jose
  • Byrne, Sam John
  • Dyson, Calum William
  • Grant, Conor James
  • Gray, Louis
  • Henen, David Boris Philippe
  • Robles Blazquez, Joel

Huddersfield Town

  • Boyle, Jack Alfie Andrew
  • Carvalho, Denilson Almeida Leonel
  • Cogill, Dylan Joseph
  • Colville, Luca Robert
  • Green, Robert Paul
  • Whitehead, Dean

Leicester City

  • Debayo, Joshua Akinkunmi
  • Huth, Robert
  • McLeod, Sammie
  • Watts, Dylan Billy
  • Yates, Cameron James

Liverpool

  • Can, Emre
  • Correia Gomes, Toni
  • Dhanda, Yan
  • Firth, Andrew
  • Flanagan, Jonathan
  • Neves Alves, Paulo Manuel
  • Parker, Mich’El
  • Williams, Michael Jordan

Manchester City

  • Diallo, Sadou
  • Duhaney, Demeaco
  • Patching, William Luke
  • Sarmiento Martinez, Erik
  • Sokol, Pawel Kazimierz
  • Toure, Gnegneri Yaya
  • Wood, Marcus James

Manchester United

  • Carrick, Michael
  • Johnstone, Max Oliver
  • Kenyon, Jake Barry
  • Moutha-Sebtaoui, Ilias
  • Redmond, Devonte Vincent
  • Richardson, Theo Huw
  • Riley, Joe
  • Scott, Charlie Thomas

Newcastle United

  • Aziakonou, Yannick
  • Cameron, Kyle Milne
  • Elmahanni, Yasin Ben
  • Findlay, Stuart}
  • Gallacher, Owen John
  • Gamez Duarte, Jesus
  • Gillesphey, Macauley
  • Gilliead, Alex Nicholas
  • Good, Curtis
  • Haidara, Massadio
  • Heaney, Mackenzie
  • Heardman, Tom
  • Hunter, Jack David
  • Kitchen, Benjamin
  • Long, Oliver James
  • McNall, Lewis
  • Pearson, Brendan Conor
  • Smith, Callum
  • Smith, Liam Phillip
  • Spooner, Craig
  • Ward, Daniel John
  • Williams, Callum Dylan
  • Woolston, Paul Hudson

Southampton

  • Bakary, Mohamed Richard
  • Cook, Oliver David Paul
  • Gardos, Florin
  • Little, Armani
  • Olomola, Olufela
  • Pied, Jeremy
  • Wood, William Nicholas

Stoke City

  • Ayoola, Olusola Adeola
  • Banks, Lewis
  • Greenidge, Jordan Neil
  • Hill, Ryan
  • Ireland, Stephen James
  • Johnson, Glen McLeod Cooper
  • Lecygne, Eddy
  • Marques De Almeida, Luis

Swansea City

  • Britton, Leon James
  • Darame, Causso
  • Davies, Mael Daniel
  • Ki, Sung Yueng
  • Paljk, Matic
  • Thomas, Lewis Rhys
  • Zaragoza, Angel Rangel

Tottenham Hotspur

  • Loft, Ryan
  • Maghoma, Christian
  • O’Reilly, Luke Patrick
  • Pritchard, Joe Cameron
  • Tsaroulla, Nicholas

Watford

  • Gartside, Nathan James
  • Lewis, Dennon Elliot
  • Mason, Brandon Alexander
  • Rogers, Louis Ronald
  • Rowan, Charles Alfred
  • Ryan, Maximillian Medwyn Richard
  • Sesay, David Junior Deen
  • Stevens, Connor John
  • Stewart, Carl Leon

West Bromwich Albion

  • Campbell, Tahvon
  • McAuley, Gareth Gerald
  • McCourt, Robbie
  • Morrison, James Clark
  • Myhill, Glyn Oliver
  • Pierce, Evan
  • Ross, Ethan Walker
  • Yacob, Claudio

West Ham United

  • Collins, James Michael
  • Evra, Patrice Latyr
Leroy Sane Joachim Loew

Why did Loew leave Sane out of Germany’s World Cup squad?

Germany manager Joachim Loew left out Manchester City winger Leroy Sane out of his final 23-man squad for the 2018 World Cup, despite the 22-year-old coming off the back of his best-ever season. He admitted disappointment in the decision from Loew but defiantly stated he will work even harder to ensure he won’t be omitted again.

“I’m obviously disappointed I won’t participate in the World Cup, but I have to accept this decision and I’ll give it my all to bounce back stronger! Nothing but the best of success to the DFB (Germany) Team in Russia. Go get that title!” he said on Twitter. Sane was initially named in the 27-man World Cup preliminary squad but didn’t make the cut when Loew had to trim the team to 23 players.

Instead, Mesut Ozil (Arsenal), Julian Brandt (Bayer Leverkusen), Julian Draxler (Paris St-Germain), Thomas Muller (Bayern Munich), Marco Reus (Borussia Dortmund), Timo Werner (RB Leipzig) and Mario Gomez (Stuttgart) were given the nod to fill the attacking roles in Russia.

Sane could hardly have performed better last season

After joining City from Schalke 04 in 2016, Sane had a largely underwhelming debut season at the Etihad Stadium which finished stronger than it started. Coming off the back of scoring and creating 14 goals in 23 Bundesliga starts in the final season for Schalke, the 22-year-old managed only eight goals in 20 Premier League outings in his debut campaign at City.

However, his second season under Pep Guardiola was a success, with Sane contributing 25 goals in 27 league starts and being named Young Player of the Year for his troubles. No teammate matched his 85 successful dribbles in the league last season, while only Kevin de Bruyne (16) made more assists (15).

Sane could hardly have performed better to get into the Germany squad, which suggests his omission wasn’t based on his performances over the last 12 months. The skilful winger was instead judged on past showings for his country and due to playing style.

Is Brandt really better for Germany than Sane?

Loew revealed that Brandt got the nod for Germany over Sane, a decision that was based on performances for the national team. He said, in quotes reported by the Metro: “It was a very close decision between him and Julian Brandt, which was made in favour of Brandt. Leroy is a huge talent. He will be back again from September. He had not arrived in international matches yet.”

Sane’s international career hasn’t quite kicked off, making 11 appearances for Germany without scoring, but Brandt has made 15 for the national team and only has one goal to his name. Goal say Loew’s tactics are the real reason behind the decision, as Sane is instead adept at counter-attacking football, being on the end of attacks, rather than building them from deep.

It’s strange that the City forward was left out of the Germany squad given he could surely be a good impact player, although Brandt is believed to be better in this role. Nevertheless, why couldn’t Loew find a place for Sane in the 23-man team?

Which team will finish second in the Premier League?

The 2017-18 Premier League title race could end up being one of the most one sided title races in Premier League history.

Manchester City have taken a massive 13 point lead at the top of the Premier League table having played a game less. This goes to show the manner of their dominance this season under Pep Guardiola.

It is their title to lose, and it will need a miraculous effort to throw away such a huge lead from this position. In fact, it is safe to say none of the chasing teams consider themselves to be a part of ‘title race’ any more.

If anything, they are playing for the second position that will give them a straight entry into the Champions League group stages next season.

Manchester United are currently occupying the second spot with 59 points, followed by Liverpool with 57, and Tottenham at 55. Chelsea are six points behind United, and their priority will be to get into the top four rather than aiming higher.

The Red Devils are yet to face Liverpool, Manchester City and Arsenal in their remaining fixtures. Plus, they have the FA Cup and the Champions League fixtures as well.

Jose Mourinho would love to add one trophy at his new club, and the FA Cup could be a realistic target given the likes of City and Liverpool have been already eliminated.

Liverpool have some tough fixtures as well. They play Chelsea on the penultimate week of the Premier League and it could prove to be a tough game especially if the Blues remain in the top four hunt.

Spurs will face Chelsea away and Manchester City at home and those two games could determine their final league position.

Having said that, with no FA Cup to focus on, Liverpool have a slight advantage over other rivals to grab the second spot.

Which Premier League Teams Look to be in Trouble This Season?

everton

The Premier League is already a third of the way through the season. The table is beginning to take shape and gaps are starting to form. In short, the template for the rest of the season has been laid down. The table as it stands is highly compressed and is likely to stay that way. The points total of all the teams outside of the top six means that many teams cannot afford to take their foot off the gas.

More managers will depart before the end of the season as owners and chairmen pull the trigger in fear of missing out on the “pot of gold”. So which teams can we really expect to be fighting a relegation battle come the end of the season?

Not Much to Choose

There is little to choose between all of the clubs outside of the top six. It is unthinkable for any of Man City, United, Liverpool, Chelsea, Tottenham or Arsenal to be relegated. So the three relegated teams will always come from the other fourteen clubs.

Read more

Joshua eyes unified heavyweight title

Anthony Joshua plans to use the first defense of his IBF heavyweight title against Dominic Breazeale on Saturday as a stepping stone to becoming the undisputed champion of the world.

The unbeaten 26-year-old takes on the American challenger at The O2 in London and insists defending the belt doesn’t add any extra pressure to the contest.

“I’m looking at winning this fight in good style so I can unify titles some time way down the line,” he said.

“There is still hard work in a weird way because, even if it is not physically draining, it is mentally because my coach expects a lot from me.

“He wants me to step up the levels, he wants me to be sharp, so even though it is not physically draining, there is still a lot of mental preparation to do as well.

“It is what it is, it is just a fight. It’s the same ring, referee and I’ve just got a different opponent in the corner and it was the same situation when I didn’t have the IBF belt so that is what I’m saying about mental preparation – I’ve just got to chill out.”

Joshua, who claimed the belt from Charles Martin back in April, weighed in at 109.8Kg, while Breazeale tipped the scales at 115.2Kg.

The British boxer has knocked out all 16 of his professional opponents, with compatriot Dillian Whyte the only man to take him past three rounds.

Tyson Fury, who withdrew from his heavyweight title rematch against Wladimir Klitschko yesterday, predicted a quick Joshua victory.

“Breazeale is unbeaten, he’s tall and heavy but that’s as far as it goes,” he said.

“He’s no more talented than Mariusz Wach and the rest of them that come over here and he’ll get busted up.

“This one might be a big old boy but if you want a chance of beating Joshua, you have to be able to box and I am not sure he can.

“Joshua is inexperienced but don’t forget he’s an Olympic gold medalist, so he wins this. There’s only one thing I am expecting and that’s another Joshua knockout.”

The Joshua bout is the headline event on what promises to be a big night for British boxing.

George Groves and Martin Murray face each other in an eliminator for the WBA world super middleweight title, while Chris Eubank Jr defends his British middleweight title against Wales’ Tom Doran.

John Wayne Hibbert meets Andrea Scarpa for the vacant WBC Silver super lightweight title and Olympic bronze medallist Anthony Ogogo is also in action.

Euro 2016: Russia v England Team News, Expected Starting Lineups And History

Russia kick-off their UEFA European Championship 2016 campaign today as Leonid Slutsky’s side face Group B favorites England in Marseille.

Slutsky’s preparations for the tournament have been hit by injuries, with midfielder Igor Denisov joining Yuri Zhirkov, Alan Dzagoev, Denis Cheryshev, and Oleg Kuzmin on the sidelines.

Spartak Moscow’s Denis Glushakov is doubtful for the game and faces a late fitness test, while Krasnodar’s Dmitri Torbinski has been unable to train this week and could miss out.

Paval Mamaev is in line to replace the injured Denisov, but the Krasnodar midfielder says Slutsky has “not detailed for certain anything about central midfield.”

Zenit’s Artur Yusupov, who was on holiday in the same Monaco hotel as the Russian team, was called up to replace Denisov but may not be ready to face England.

“I was planning to fly back to Moscow (on Monday),” Yusupov told UEFA.com.

“I didn’t even have my football boots with me and none of my kit. I had to borrow from (Russia midfielder) Roman Neustadter.

“After being on holiday for 14 days, of course it is difficult to get down to work. I don’t really know myself what state I will be in.”

By contrast, England arrive in France as the only team win all of their qualifying fixtures, and have since claimed victories over Turkey, Australia and Portugal in their warm-up matches.

Questions over Roy Hodgson’s team selection have dominated the pre-match build-up, with captain Wayne Rooney’s role in the team coming under increased scrutiny.

Slutsky has claimed Rooney is “not the player that he was”, but the Manchester United striker says he is looking forward to the tournament.

“You can sense the excitement around the team and around the team hotel, and I think you sense that excitement around the country,” he said.

“Certainly the fans are doing that, but the players are doing exactly the same.

“We’re the ones going out on the pitch and we’re the ones who have to go and do it, so hopefully we can and we’ll give everyone good memories.”

Rooney faces competition for a starting role from Harry Kane and Jamie Vardy, although newspaper reports have suggested the latter is likely to start on the bench.

England defenders Gary Cahill, Chris Smalling and Ryan Bertrand all suffered knocks during training earlier in the week, but are expected to be available for selection.

Despite the uncertainty surrounding England’s line-up, Hodgson believes England have an excellent chance of making progress.

“There is definitely a selection headache in terms of so many good players who could quite easily command a place in the team,” he said.

“I’m pleased with the headaches and that having gone through three matches and some intensive training we still have all our players available.

“We know we have a team who, if they perform to the level we think they can perform to, will make it difficult for our opponents.

“We have a lot of respect for Russia. We think they are a very good team, a very experienced team with lot of players who’ve played together a long time at CSKA and Zenit.”

With England’s starting eleven still unknown, Stutsky plans to announce the Russian line-up as late as possible.

“There is always a debate between youth and experience,” said Slutsky.

“It is impossible to say which is better and we have had this discussion on a number of occasions. We will also have a lot of players who will be experiencing a major tournament for the first time.

“I don’t think it would be correct to say whether this is the most important match of my career. I know there is a lot of responsibility with the whole country watching and I would like us to play good football tomorrow and for them to get the result they want.”

Artem Dzyuba is expected to get the nod in attack after bagging eight goals during Russia’s qualifying campaign.

The Zenit marksman is hoping to have a big impact on this year’s tournament.

“Four years ago, before Euro 2012, which I eventually did not play in, I called myself a lion cub, but now I am a lion,” he said.

The two countries have met just twice in the last decade during the Euro 2008 qualifiers, with England winning 3-0 at Wembley, while Russia triumphed 2-1 in Moscow in a game famous for a misplaced Gary Neville back-pass that led to an own goal and England failing to qualify for the tournament.

Russia, as the Soviet Union, won the first ever European Championships in 1960 beating Yugoslavia 2-1 after extra-time in the final.

They have lost their three subsequent Euro finals in 1964, 1972 and 1988.

England have never progressed beyond the semi-finals at the Euros.

The Three Lions finished third in 1968 and were knocked out in the last four by Germany in 1996.

England have been eliminated on penalties in three of their last four Euros in 1996, 2004 and 2012.

Expected Starting Lineups:

England: Hart; Walker, Cahill, Smalling, Rose; Dier, Alli; Lallana, Rooney, Sterling; Kane.
Russia: Akinfeev; Smolnikov, V Berezutski, Ignashevich, Schennikov; Golovin, Neustadter; Smolov, Shatov, Kokorin; Dzyuba.

Copa America Blunder: Organizers play Chile’s national anthem for Uruguay’s team

The Copa America Centenary organizers were left red-faced with embarrassment after they played Chile’s national anthem by mistake for Uruguay’s team in the latter’s match against Mexico on Sunday.

Uruguay players had lined up before kickoff but as the unfamiliar music played over the stadium sound system, Uruguayan players looked around awkwardly not knowing what to do next. The Uruguayan press immediately took offense at what it termed as a disrespectful gesture. Video of the incident is below:

For their part, the organizers were quick to recognize their mistake and rectify it, while also issuing an immediate apology:

Mexico comfortably won their game against Uruguay 3-1 in a match that saw both sides get a red card, the earliest own goal in Copa America history (in the fourth minute) and a late double-salvo in the 85th and 90th minutes by Mexico to close out a game they dominated in possession.

Earlier on the weekend, Brazil could only draw their opening game against Ecuador while hosts USA were easily beaten by Colombia in the opening game on Friday night.

Argentina play Chile on Monday.